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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Jan Schakowsky
Representative (D-Illinois)
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Schakowsky: (question to Keith Alexander) I have a couple of questions. What about having an official outside of the NSA to provide prior approval of what would be reasonable, articulable suspicion in order query a name and ask for the information?
Dutch Ruppersberger
U.S. Representative D-Maryland, Ranking Member on the Intelligence Committee
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Ruppersberger: We are vetting a measure that would create a presidentially appointed Senate confirmed Inspector General of the NSA to provide an extra independent check. We are discussing ways to change the makeup of the FISA court to correct the perception that it is controlled by one political party or other. We are looking into creating a privacy advocate, a non-executive branch lawyer who would take an independent position on matters before the FISA court and involve significant constructions or interpretations of the FISA law.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Alexander: (answer to Schakowsky about outside odfficials) The issue that I see, we tried that back a couple of years ago with the court. And it got up to nine days and the court gave us back that authority to do it. I would propose a counter offer where every one that we do is within 48, 96 hours we send to the court and if we make a mistake or something, disagree with, have a way of doing that. So that we meet the timelines that you need or as Chris mentioned for some of these options where it is time is of the essence. i use the Najibullah Zazi case where this was a one-week thing. You can't afford that. So I would say we would absolutely be willing to work with you on something along those lines or with the committee.
Jan Schakowsky
Representative (D-Illinois)
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Schakowsky: Currently the nsa is holding for five years. the business record data many people suggested it's too long. what do you think about shortening the time whether nsa or some other entity hold it? Alexander: Our analysts think somewhere around three years is probably the least that you could do. and so if we did that, it goes back to what congressman said, i think three years makes sense that's what our analysts come up with.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Alexander: Our analysts think somewhere around three years is probably the least that you could do. And so if we did that, it goes back to what Congressman Ruppersberger said, I think three years makes sense that's what our analysts come up with.
Dutch Ruppersberger
U.S. Representative D-Maryland, Ranking Member on the Intelligence Committee
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Ruppersberger: And the most intriguing but also the most widely challenging is changing how section 215 is implemented. Can we move away from bulk collection and towards a system like the one used in criminal prosecutions system in which the government subpoenas individuals call data records, phone numbers, no content to be used for link analysis.
James Langevin
Representative (D-Rhode Island)
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Langevin (question to Alexander and Clapper): I’d like to give you an opportunity to talk about, if we're going rebalance. What the trade-offs are. Because obviously if every action is going to be an opposite reaction and there are some, for example, in the Sensenbrenner Legislation wants to repeal much of the USA Patriot Act. If we do that, what are the ramifications? And what are some of the other areas where we can curtail perhaps some of the surveillance. What would be the impact of that ?
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Alexander: If we take away that program, what you do is you create a gap. Now that's a risk that the Congress and the policy makers will set up. We will follow faithfully, the laws that you establish as we always have in the policies that are set up. What you're asking me is there are a risk and the answer is yes. We know that risk because that's where we existed in 9/11. We know that risk because that's where we existed in 9/11. And this is one of the programs that we took.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Clapper: in all of this, whether we amend a tool or remove it entirely, it actually is the same impact as a cut, as a reduction in capability occasioned by sequestration. And the net effect is we will do the very best we can with the tools and capabilities we're given. But I think it's incumbent on all of us collectively to recognize the fact that when that happens we are incurring greater risk. i say that as a general comment.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Clapper: the (unauthorized) disclosures for better or for worse have lowered the threshold for discussing these matters in public so to the degree that we can discuss them we will. But this public discussion should be based on an accurate understanding of the intelligence community. Who we are, what we do and how we’re overseen. In the last few months the manner in which our activities have been characterize has often been incomplete, inaccurate or misleading or some combination there of.
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